Port-wide

Emissions inventories

To know if we are effectively reducing emissions, they must first be measured. That’s why we conduct an air emissions inventory at the Port of Vancouver every five years, at the same time as regional and national inventories are conducted. The results identify trends so we can improve our programs and policies, and ultimately reduce emissions.

2015 Port of Vancouver emissions inventory report

The 2015 emissions inventory for the Port of Vancouver estimates air emissions from marine, rail, on-road, non-road, and administrative activities associated with the port.

2015 Emissions inventory report: Port of Vancouver – summary

Reports

The 2015 port emissions inventory estimates air emissions from marine, rail, on-road, non-road, and administrative activities associated with the Port of Vancouver. The 2005 and 2010 port emissions inventories focused on land-side operations, to complement inventories prepared by Metro Vancouver for the region, and Environment Canada, for marine activities.

2015 Emissions inventory report: Port of Vancouver [PDF]
2015 Emissions inventory report: Port of Vancouver – summary [PDF]
2010 Emissions inventory report: Port of Vancouver [PDF]
2005 Emissions inventory report: Burrard Inlet and Roberts Bank [PDF]
2005 Emissions inventory report: Burrard Inlet and Roberts Bank – summary [PDF]


Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy

Air emissions readily cross regional and national boundaries, which is why we work collaboratively with other major ports and government agencies in the region to address air emissions.

We partner with the ports of Seattle and Tacoma and the Northwest Seaport Alliance to reduce port-related air emissions in the shared Georgia Basin-Puget Sound air shed. This shared strategy benefits from active input from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Metro Vancouver, the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Goals

The overarching goals of the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy (NWPCAS), relative to a 2005 baseline, are:

  • 75 per cent reduction in diesel particulate matter emissions per tonne of cargo by 2015 and 80 per cent by 2020
  • 10 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions per tonne of cargo by 2015 and 15 per cent by 2020

The strategy includes performance targets for each of the primary port emissions sources, including ocean-going vessels, harbour vessels, cargo-handling equipment, container trucks, locomotives and port administrative operations.

Reports

The strategy was established in 2007, and updated in 2013. We published our first progress report on the 2013 Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy objectives in 2014. Implementation reports are published annually.

Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy [PDF]
2016 Implementation report: Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy [PDF]
2015 Implementation report: Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy [PDF]
2014 Implementation report: Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy [PDF]
2013 Implementation report: Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy [PDF]


Air quality monitoring

We use our emissions inventory to help us understand the quantity and source of pollutants emitted, but it does not tell us the impact of these pollutants in locations where people live, work and play. For example, pollutants are dispersed by wind and can react with other components to create different pollutants. Ambient air quality monitoring helps us understand the concentration of pollutants in the air at a given location, be it from port or non-port sources.

We collaborate with Metro Vancouver and other partners to monitor air quality around the port through the following initiatives:

  • Metro Vancouver’s T39 air quality station, located at Pebble Hill, Tsawwassen, funded by the port authority, has formed part of Metro Vancouver’s ambient air monitoring network since 2010. It is used in both Metro Vancouver’s regional air assessments as well as our own environmental assessments.
  • Tsawwassen First Nation Air Quality Monitoring Program, conducted in 2014 and 2015, included an assessment of air quality on Tsawwassen First Nation lands, compared to Metro Vancouver’s T39 air quality station, as well as the contribution of coal to dustfall. We led this study, with input and support from Tsawwassen First Nation, Metro Vancouver and Westshore Terminals.
  • Burrard Inlet Local Air Quality Area Study Phase II monitoring began along the south shore of Burrard Inlet in 2014. We funded the purchase, installation and a portion of the maintenance for this monitoring, which will be used to better understand the effect of port activities on air quality in Burrard Inlet.