Supporting endangered species

There are 37 federally listed endangered species that are likely to be present in Burrard Inlet and the Fraser River, areas within our jurisdiction, and we work to responsibly protect them from the effects of port activity.

We test areas of interest and carry out field surveys to identify the presence of endangered species throughout our jurisdiction. We can then determine whether port activity or proposed development on port lands or waters is likely to have a negative impact and, if so, what measures may be required to reduce the effects.

Activities that may affect these species include movement of vegetation, soil or gravel, tree maintenance or weed control, or construction activities such as demolition, painting, bank stabilization, dredging or pile driving. We work with port tenants to protect endangered species by identifying and minimizing potential impacts during development and maintenance activities.

Some examples of our preventative work includes shifting development around trees to the winter months to minimize impacts to forest-dwelling endangered species, checking for birds’ nests or bat roosts before conducting maintenance or demolishing structures, or adjusting timing of dredging activities in the Fraser River to avoid harm to juvenile salmon.

If you are a tenant or project permit applicant, see our project and environmental review page for more information on how to plan routine maintenance or project development activities in a manner that minimizes the impact on endangered species.

Spotlight: a home for endangered honey bees

We have partnered with the urban beekeeping company Alvéole to host two beehives at our maintenance facility on the south shore of Burrard Inlet. Bees are an important part of a healthy ecosystem and are vital to biodiversity, which is why their global population decline is a cause for concern. We’re helping to increase the honeybee population in the area by hosting up to 50,000 bees in each hive.